CNHI News Service

Features

January 10, 2013

It's not the same old Home Economics class anymore

ANDERSON, Ind. —  

When Nancy Gates began teaching home economics decades ago, most if not all of her students were girls. The focus of the food classes was on cooking.



Today, Gates — a teacher in Family and Consumer Sciences (it’s no longer home economics) —  said she has more boys in her class than girls and much of the focus is on nutrition, budgeting for food and making good choices.

One of her favorite recipes — golden cream soup — is part of her classes; it teaches several lessons, including some that she finds surprising. Many students have never peeled, chopped or cubed vegetables. Some have never understood the importance of following a recipe or the terms used in cooking.

“When I introduce the recipe to students a lot of them see all those veggies in it and say, ‘I don’t know about that,’” Gates said laughing. “But when they taste it they really do seem to enjoy it.”

With this recipe students learn measuring techniques by making and thickening a sauce with flour and cheese, simmering and constantly stirring.

“It is important when you are thickening a sauce that you cook it at a low temperature and stir constantly so it doesn’t scorch,” Gates said. “And if you want to make a lower calorie version you can use skim milk instead of whole and use low-fat cheese in place of the Velveeta.”

Gates enjoys the growing focus on wellness and nutrition at the high school.

“So many students are responsible for doing some cooking at home and at the high school level they are getting to the age where they are soon going to be independent,“ she said. “I think it is important for them to have the cooking and consumer skills to make wise choices with their food budgets."

The courses incorporate an all-encompassing picture into education, not just cooking, techniques and terms. Students learn how to read food labels, prepare things from scratch, budget, using small appliances and nutrition and wellness.

---

Abbey Doyle is a reporter for The Herald Bulletin in Anderson, Ind.



1
Text Only
Features
  • Sparring justices find little disagreement at the opera

    Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg revealed a different view of U.S. Supreme Court on Saturday when she described about her passion for opera, one she shares with Justice Antonin Scalia.

    July 21, 2014

  • 130408_NT_BEA_good kids We're raising a generation of timid kids

    A week ago, a woman was charged with leaving her child in the car while she went into a store. Her 11-year-old child. This week, a woman was arrested for allowing her 9-year-old daughter to go to the park alone. Which raises just one question: America, what the heck is wrong with you?

    July 17, 2014 1 Photo

  • 25 hidden secrets in "Weird Al's" "Word Crimes" video

    Yankovic's 14th album was released this week, and it warms my heart containers that he's kept up his geeky brand of humor for so long. While he has written so many incredible songs, none have spoken to my love of proper grammar.
    Until "Word Crimes."

    July 16, 2014

  • ent_taylorswift.jpg There's less good music now — here's why

    Taylor Swift, the seven-time Grammy winner, is known for her articulate lyrics, so there was nothing surprising about her writing a long column for The Wall Street Journal about the future of the music industry. Yet there's reason to doubt the optimism of what she had to say.

    July 8, 2014 1 Photo

  • wheat1.jpg Backlash has begun against gluten-free dieters

    The swelling ranks of Americans adopting gluten-free diets have given rise to another hot trend: people calling the whole thing a bunch of baloney.

    July 7, 2014 1 Photo

  • Screen Shot 2014-07-01 at 4.21.43 PM.png A messaging app that doesn't use words at all

    About 10,000 people have signed up for usernames for a chat app that isn't even out yet: Emoj.li. It's an instant messenger app that uses no words at all — not even "Yo" or "Hodor!" Instead, it employs only emoji icons.

    July 1, 2014 1 Photo

  • lawgrad.jpg Things looking up for law school grads

    This might sound weird, but here goes: Now might be a pretty good time to think about law school. For the sixth year running, the employment rate fell, as schools produced a record number of graduates for an industry without the room for them. There was, however, a nugget of good news buried in the data.

    June 25, 2014 1 Photo

  • breaking-up.jpg Thinking about breaking up? Flip a coin

    In their latest book, 'Think Like a Freak," Steven Levitt and Stephen Dubner suggest that, contrary to what many people have told you in life, you should quit. That is, when things get tough, you shouldn't always tough them out and stick with it. Instead, you should quit and do so sooner rather than later.

    June 25, 2014 1 Photo

  • The Internet has changed how we curse

    Relatively recent technologies — cable television, satellite radio, and social media — provide us with a not-too-unrealistic picture of how often people swear in public and what they say when they do.

    June 24, 2014

  • baby-generic.jpg For millennials, out-of-wedlock childbirth is the norm

    This month brings us yet another reminder that, for young Americans, having children outside of marriage is very much "the new normal," as The New York Times once put it.

    June 23, 2014 1 Photo

News
Sports

Opinion